Learning Outcomes and The EYLF – Your ultimate guide.

The EYLF emphasises the importance of play-based learning, recognising that children learn best through active exploration and engagement with their environment. It has been build on the principles of belonging, being, and becoming, which emphasise the importance of children’s sense of identity, their connections with others and the world around them, and their ongoing development and learning.

“Looking at the whole child for holistic education.”

-Making Education: Certificate III Training Materials.

The framework outlines principles, practices, and learning outcomes that guide educators in designing and implementing their early childhood programs across the country that are responsive to the individual needs, interests, and abilities of each children. It also highlights the importance of building strong partnerships with families and communities to support children’s learning and development.

“It takes a village to raise a child”.

-African Proverb

So, what do we mean when we say “Learning Outcomes”?

Foundation for Learning and Development: The EYLF recognises that early childhood is a critical period for laying the foundation for lifelong learning and development. Learning outcomes, therefore, serve as guiding principles that inform educators about the essential skills, knowledge, and dispositions children should acquire during this stage.

Holistic Development: The EYLF emphasises holistic development, recognising that children learn and develop across multiple domains, including physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language development. Learning outcomes reflect this holistic approach by encompassing a broad range of skills and competencies that contribute to children’s overall wellbeing and success.

Individualised and Child-Centred: The EYLF acknowledges that every child is unique, with their own strengths, interests, and learning styles. Learning outcomes are designed to be flexible and adaptable, allowing educators to tailor learning experiences to meet the individual needs and preferences of each child. This individualised approach ensures that all children have the opportunity to thrive and reach their full potential.

Progression and Continuity: Learning outcomes in the EYLF are structured to reflect the progression of children’s learning and development over time. They are organised into five overarching outcomes, each with a set of indicators that describe observable behaviours and skills at different stages of development. This allows educators to track children’s progress and provide targeted support as they advance along their learning journey.

Partnerships with Families and Communities: The EYLF emphasises the importance of building strong partnerships between educators, families, and communities to support children’s learning and development. Learning outcomes serve as a common language for communication and collaboration, enabling educators to share information with families about children’s achievements, goals, and areas for growth. By involving families and communities in the learning process, educators can create a more supportive and enriching environment for children both inside and outside the classroom.

So learning outcomes within the context of the Australian EYLF are designed to provide a comprehensive framework for promoting children’s holistic development, fostering individualised learning experiences, tracking progress over time, and building collaborative partnerships with families and communities. They serve as guiding principles that underpin high-quality early childhood education and care practices, ensuring that all children have the opportunity to thrive and succeed.

So, what are the learning outcomes?

The Australian Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) outlines five learning outcomes that focus on children’s holistic development:

Learning Outcome 1 – Children have a strong sense of identity:

This outcome emphasises that children develop a sense of self and respect for others’ identities. It involves understanding and feeling good about themselves, developing a positive self-esteem, and respecting diversity in others.

Learning Outcome 2 – Children are connected with and contribute to their world:

This outcome highlights children’s ability to interact and engage with their environment. It includes fostering a sense of belonging to communities and respecting nature and the broader world around them.

Learning Outcome 3 – Children have a strong sense of wellbeing:

At the core of this outcome is the intention of promoting children’s physical and mental health. It involves providing a safe and nurturing environment, supporting children’s emotional needs, and helping them develop resilience and self-regulation skills.

Learning Outcome 4 – Children are confident and involved learners:

This outcome focuses on nurturing children’s curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. It encourages active participation in experiences and investigations, promoting a love of learning and a sense of agency.

Learning Outcome 5 – Children are effective communicators:

This outcome highlights the importance of developing children’s communication skills. It involves supporting children in expressing themselves effectively, listening to others, and using language and other forms of communication to connect with others and make meaning of their experiences.

Can we go even deeper?

Well luckily, we can. Learning outcomes have an “Outcome” level and an “Indicator” level. The indicator level takes a broad idea from the outcome level and breaks it down into more specific things to look for, foster and support the development of. It’s a collection of sub-categories or the sub-headings of the broader outcome. This helps turn tricky concepts and ideas into easy-to-understand elements.

Learning Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity.

Whenever you see this outcome, just think about the following concepts to support and foster development in:

  1. Self-awareness: Children are encouraged to develop an understanding of themselves as individuals with unique characteristics, preferences, and abilities. This involves recognising and valuing their own strengths, interests, and limitations.
  2. Cultural identity: Children are supported in developing an awareness and appreciation of their cultural background, including their family traditions, customs, and language. They are encouraged to celebrate their cultural heritage and to respect and learn about the diverse cultures of others.
  3. Belonging and connection: Children are helped to develop a sense of belonging and connection within their family, community, and broader society. This involves fostering positive relationships with family members, peers, educators, and other significant adults, as well as understanding their roles and responsibilities within different social contexts.
  4. Agency and autonomy: Children are empowered to express their thoughts, feelings, and ideas, and to make choices and decisions that reflect their own interests and preferences. This supports their sense of agency and autonomy, enabling them to take an active role in shaping their own lives and experiences.
  5. Resilience and self-esteem: Children are supported in developing resilience and self-esteem, which are essential for navigating challenges and setbacks. This involves providing opportunities for children to take risks, solve problems, and learn from mistakes, as well as offering praise and encouragement to build their confidence and self-belief.
  6. Gender identity and diversity: Children are encouraged to explore and express their gender identity in a supportive and inclusive environment. Educators promote positive attitudes towards gender diversity and challenge stereotypes and biases, ensuring that all children feel valued and respected for who they are.

These outcomes and indicators can be supported through a variety of activities that foster self-awareness, cultural understanding, and a positive sense of self. Here are some go-to activities which you can run in your classrooms and learning environments to support development:

All About Me Collage:
Provide children with magazines, photographs, and art supplies to create collages that represent themselves, their families, and their interests. Encourage them to share their collages with their peers, explaining what each image represents and why it is important to them.

Family Tree Project:
Invite children to create family trees using pictures or drawings of family members. Encourage discussions about family traditions, cultural heritage, and the roles of different family members in their lives. This can be done individually, in small groups or together as a whole class project.

Celebrating Diversity:
Explore diversity through books, songs, and discussions about different cultures, languages, and traditions. Encourage children to share stories or artifacts from their own cultural backgrounds and celebrate the similarities and differences among their peers.

Mirror Play:
Set up a mirror station with various props and costumes for children to use in dramatic play. Encourage them to dress up as different characters and explore different roles and identities through imaginative play.

Feelings Chart:
Create a feelings chart with pictures or drawings of different emotions (e.g., happy, sad, angry, excited). Use the chart to help children identify and express their feelings and discuss strategies for managing and coping with different emotions.

Name Recognition Activities:
Play games and do activities that help children recognise and write their own names. Use name tags, puzzles, or sensory trays with letter-shaped objects to reinforce letter recognition and spelling skills.

Role-play Scenarios:
Set up role-play scenarios that allow children to explore different roles and identities. For example, create a pretend restaurant where children can take on the roles of chefs, servers, and customers, or set up a doctor’s office where children can play the roles of doctors, nurses, and patients.

Personal Reflection Journals:
Provide children with journals or notebooks where they can write or draw about their thoughts, feelings, and experiences. Encourage them to reflect on their day, their achievements, and the things that make them unique.

These activities provide opportunities for children to explore and celebrate their own identities, develop a sense of belonging and self-worth, and appreciate the diversity of the world around them. By engaging in these activities, children can develop a strong sense of identity that serves as the foundation for their social, emotional, and cognitive development.Top of Form

Overall, Learning Outcome 1: Children have a strong sense of identity of the EYLF recognises the importance of children developing a strong sense of identity as the foundation for their social, emotional, and cognitive development. By fostering self-awareness, cultural identity, belonging, agency, resilience, and self-esteem, educators help children build the confidence and resilience they need to thrive in today’s diverse and rapidly changing world.

Learning Outcome 2: Children are connected with and contribute to their world.

This outcome focuses on nurturing children’s sense of belonging and responsibility within their families, communities, and the broader world. Here’s a closer look at its key components:

  1. Belonging and Community: Children are encouraged to develop a sense of belonging to their family, cultural group, community, and the natural environment. This involves fostering positive relationships with family members, peers, educators, and neighbours, as well as understanding and appreciating the diverse cultures, traditions, and perspectives within their community.
  2. Responsibility and Contribution: Children are supported in understanding their role and responsibilities within different social contexts and in contributing positively to their communities. This may include participating in community events and activities, helping others in need, caring for the environment, and showing empathy and kindness towards others.
  3. Environmental Awareness and Sustainability: Children are encouraged to develop an understanding of the natural world and their connection to it. They learn about the importance of caring for the environment and promoting sustainability practices, such as recycling, reducing waste, and conserving resources. Educators provide opportunities for children to explore and interact with nature, fostering a sense of wonder and appreciation for the world around them.
  4. Global Citizenship: Children are introduced to the concept of global citizenship and encouraged to develop empathy, respect, and understanding towards people from different cultures and backgrounds. They learn about global issues such as poverty, inequality, and environmental conservation, and are empowered to take action to make a positive difference in the world, both locally and globally.
  5. Cultural Diversity and Inclusion: Children are exposed to diverse perspectives, traditions, and ways of life, promoting respect, acceptance, and inclusion. Educators create a multicultural and inclusive environment where children feel valued and respected for who they are, regardless of their cultural background, ethnicity, religion, or abilities.

These areas can be supported through a variety of activities that foster children’s sense of belonging, connection to their community, and responsibility for the world around them. Here are some example activities:

Community Walk:
Take children on a community walk around the neighbourhood or local area. Encourage them to observe and explore their surroundings, pointing out significant landmarks, places of interest, and community resources such as parks, libraries, and shops.

Community Helpers Role-play:
Set up a dramatic play area with props and costumes related to different community helpers (e.g., firefighters, police officers, doctors). Encourage children to take on different roles and act out scenarios that highlight the important contributions of these individuals to the community.

Community Service Projects:
Engage children in age-appropriate community service projects, such as cleaning up a local park, planting trees, or making cards for residents of a nursing home. Encourage discussions about the impact of their actions on the community and the importance of helping others.

Cultural Celebrations:
Celebrate cultural diversity through activities such as cooking traditional foods, making crafts, and learning songs and dances from different cultures. Encourage children to share their own cultural traditions and customs with their peers, promoting understanding and respect for diverse perspectives.

Nature Exploration:
Take children on nature walks or outdoor excursions to explore the natural environment. Encourage them to observe plants, animals, and natural phenomena, and discuss the importance of caring for the environment and preserving natural habitats.

Community Visitors:
Invite community members, such as local police officers, firefighters, or healthcare workers, to visit the service and talk to the children about their roles and responsibilities. Encourage children to ask questions and engage in discussions about how these individuals contribute to the community.

Community Maps:
Create a community map with children, highlighting key features and landmarks in the local area. Encourage children to contribute their own drawings or symbols to represent places that are important to them, such as their homes, schools, and favorite parks.

Community Stories:
Read books or tell stories that highlight different aspects of community life, such as friendship, cooperation, and helping others. Encourage children to discuss the themes and messages of the stories and relate them to their own experiences in their community.

These activities provide opportunities for children to develop a sense of connection and belonging to their community, understand their role and responsibility as active members of society, and appreciate the diversity and richness of the world around them. By engaging in these activities, children can develop empathy, respect, and a sense of social responsibility that will serve them well throughout their lives.

By focusing on Learning Outcome 2 – Children are connected with and contribute to their world., educators help children develop a sense of agency and responsibility as active participants in their families, communities, and the world at large. Through meaningful experiences and interactions, children learn to appreciate diversity, show empathy and compassion, and take action to create positive change, laying the foundation for a more inclusive, equitable, and sustainable future.

Learning Outcome 3: Children have a strong sense of wellbeing.

This outcome recognises the fundamental importance of promoting children’s physical and mental health, safety, and emotional wellbeing. Let’s explore it in more depth:

  1. Physical Health and Wellbeing: Educators support children in developing healthy habits and lifestyles that promote their physical health and wellbeing. This includes providing nutritious meals and snacks, promoting regular physical activity and active play, and teaching children about personal hygiene and self-care practices.
  2. Emotional Wellbeing: Children are encouraged to recognise, express, and manage their emotions in healthy and constructive ways. Educators create a supportive and nurturing environment where children feel safe to express their feelings, seek comfort and support when needed, and develop resilience in the face of challenges and stressors.
  3. Safety and Risk Management: Educators prioritise the safety and wellbeing of children by implementing policies and practices that minimise risks and hazards in the learning environment. This includes ensuring adequate supervision, maintaining clean and well-maintained facilities, and teaching children about personal safety and stranger danger.
  4. Sense of Security and Belonging: Children thrive when they feel secure, valued, and connected to others. Educators foster a sense of security and belonging by building positive relationships with children, families, and peers, and by creating a warm, welcoming, and inclusive environment where everyone feels respected and supported.
  5. Holistic Approach to Wellbeing: The EYLF recognises that children’s wellbeing is influenced by multiple factors, including their physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development. Educators take a holistic approach to wellbeing, addressing the interconnectedness of these domains and providing integrated support to promote children’s overall health and happiness.
  6. Self-regulation and Coping Skills: Children learn to regulate their emotions, behaviours, and impulses, developing self-control and coping skills that enable them to navigate social situations and manage stress effectively. Educators teach children strategies for self-soothing, problem-solving, and conflict resolution, empowering them to become confident and resilient individuals.

Teachers should look to the following activities which support children’s physical health, emotional wellbeing, and sense of security:

Mindfulness and Relaxation:
Introduce children to mindfulness and relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing exercises, guided imagery, or simple yoga poses. Encourage them to practice these techniques regularly to help them manage stress and promote feelings of calmness and relaxation.

Healthy Eating Habits:
Engage children in hands-on cooking activities that promote healthy eating habits. Encourage them to help prepare nutritious snacks and meals using fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. Discuss the importance of eating a balanced diet for overall health and wellbeing.

Physical Activity and Exercise:
Provide opportunities for children to engage in active play and physical exercise both indoors and outdoors. Set up obstacle courses, dance parties, or outdoor games that encourage children to move their bodies and develop gross motor skills.

Emotion Regulation Strategies:
Teach children strategies for managing and expressing their emotions in healthy ways. Provide a calm-down corner or quiet space where children can go to take a break and practice self-soothing techniques such as deep breathing or using a stress ball.

Self-care Routines:
Support children in developing self-care routines that promote personal hygiene and wellbeing. Teach them the importance of washing hands, brushing teeth, and getting enough sleep, and provide opportunities for them to practice these skills independently.

Nature and Outdoor Exploration:
Take children on nature walks or outdoor adventures to explore the natural environment. Encourage them to engage their senses by observing plants, animals, and natural phenomena, and discuss the benefits of spending time in nature for physical and mental health.

Emotional Expression Through Art:
Provide art materials and creative outlets for children to express their emotions through drawing, painting, or sculpting. Encourage them to create artwork that reflects their feelings and experiences, and facilitate discussions about their artwork and what it means to them.

Positive Affirmations and Encouragement:
Use positive affirmations and encouragement to reinforce children’s self-esteem and self-worth. Praise their efforts and achievements, and provide specific feedback that highlights their strengths and accomplishments.

These activities provide opportunities for children to develop the skills, habits, and attitudes that promote overall wellbeing and resilience. By supporting children’s physical health, emotional regulation, and self-care practices, educators help lay the foundation for lifelong health and happiness.

By focusing on Learning Outcome 3 – Children have a strong sense of wellbeing, educators play a critical role in promoting children’s wellbeing and laying the foundation for a lifetime of health and happiness. Through supportive relationships, meaningful experiences, and responsive care, children develop the skills, attitudes, and behaviours that contribute to their overall wellbeing and success in life.

Learning Outcome 4: Children are confident and involved learners.

This outcome highlights the importance of fostering children’s curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. Let’s explore it in more detail:

  1. Curiosity and Inquiry: Educators encourage children to ask questions, explore their environment, and seek answers through active inquiry and investigation. They provide opportunities for hands-on learning experiences that spark curiosity and stimulate children’s natural sense of wonder and discovery.
  2. Active Participation: Children are actively engaged in the learning process, taking an active role in shaping their own learning experiences. Educators create an environment that promotes children’s agency and autonomy, where they feel empowered to make choices, take risks, and express their ideas and interests.
  3. Problem-solving and Critical Thinking: Children develop problem-solving skills and critical thinking abilities as they engage in open-ended and challenging tasks. Educators scaffold children’s learning by providing opportunities for experimentation, trial and error, and reflection, helping them develop strategies for solving problems and making decisions independently.
  4. Persistence and Resilience: Children learn to persevere in the face of challenges and setbacks, developing resilience and a growth mindset. Educators provide support and encouragement, praising children’s efforts and celebrating their successes, while also teaching them that mistakes are a natural part of learning and an opportunity for growth.
  5. Creativity and Imagination: Children are encouraged to express themselves creatively through art, music, storytelling, and imaginative play. Educators provide a rich and stimulating environment that fosters children’s creativity and imagination, allowing them to explore and experiment with different materials, mediums, and ideas.
  6. Collaboration and Communication: Children learn to work collaboratively with others, sharing ideas, cooperating, and negotiating to achieve common goals. Educators facilitate meaningful interactions and social experiences that promote effective communication, teamwork, and social skills, preparing children for success in group settings and collaborative endeavours.

You can promote these through a variety of activities that foster children’s curiosity, creativity, and enthusiasm for learning. Here are some example activities:

Exploratory Play:
Set up different play areas with hands-on materials and open-ended activities that encourage exploration and discovery. Examples include sensory bins, building blocks, art stations, and dramatic play areas. Allow children to freely explore and experiment with materials at their own pace.

Investigation Stations:
Create investigation stations with puzzles, magnifying glasses, and other inquiry-based materials. Encourage children to ask questions, make predictions, and explore scientific concepts through hands-on experimentation and observation.

Project-based Learning:
Engage children in long-term, project-based learning experiences that allow them to investigate topics of interest in depth. Provide opportunities for children to conduct research, collaborate with peers, and present their findings in creative ways, such as through artwork, presentations, or dramatic performances.

Problem-solving Challenges:
Present children with open-ended challenges or problems to solve using critical thinking and problem-solving skills. For example, provide them with building materials and ask them to design and construct a structure that can withstand a certain amount of weight or create a new invention to solve a real-world problem.

Creative Expression:
Provide a variety of art materials and creative outlets for children to express themselves through drawing, painting, sculpting, and other forms of artistic expression. Encourage children to experiment with different mediums and techniques to unleash their creativity and imagination.

Outdoor Exploration:
Take children on nature walks or outdoor excursions to explore the natural world. Encourage them to observe plants, animals, and natural phenomena and engage in outdoor play activities that promote gross motor skills, risk-taking, and problem-solving.

Literacy and Numeracy Games:
Incorporate literacy and numeracy concepts into fun and engaging games and activities. For example, play rhyming games, scavenger hunts, or counting games that reinforce early literacy and numeracy skills while promoting active participation and enjoyment.

Role-play and Pretend Play:
Set up role-play scenarios that allow children to take on different roles and explore different perspectives. Provide props and costumes related to different occupations or real-life situations and encourage children to engage in imaginative play that promotes creativity, communication, and social skills.

These activities provide opportunities for children to become active, curious, and confident learners who are motivated to explore, discover, and create. By fostering a love of learning and providing engaging and meaningful experiences, educators help children develop the skills, attitudes, and dispositions they need to become lifelong learners and successful contributors to society.Top of Form

By focusing on Learning Outcome 4 – Children are confident and involved learners, educators inspire children to become active, curious, and confident learners who are motivated to explore, discover, and create. Through engaging experiences, supportive relationships, and opportunities for self-expression and collaboration, children develop the skills, attitudes, and dispositions they need to become lifelong learners and successful contributors to society.

Learning Outcome 5: Children are effective communicators.

This outcome highlights the importance of developing children’s communication skills in all forms, including language, literacy, and numeracy. Let’s explore it further:

  1. Language Development: Children are supported in developing their language skills, including both receptive (listening and understanding) and expressive (speaking and communicating) language abilities. Educators provide rich language experiences through storytelling, conversations, rhymes, songs, and play, helping children build vocabulary, grammar, and fluency.
  2. Literacy Skills: Children develop early literacy skills such as phonemic awareness, letter recognition, and comprehension, laying the foundation for reading and writing. Educators create literacy-rich environments with access to a wide range of books, print materials, and literacy resources, and provide opportunities for children to engage in meaningful literacy activities that promote literacy skills development.
  3. Numeracy Skills: Children develop basic numeracy skills such as counting, sorting, patterning, and problem-solving. Educators integrate numeracy concepts into everyday experiences and activities, such as cooking, block play, and outdoor exploration, helping children develop a strong foundation in mathematical thinking and reasoning.
  4. Non-verbal Communication: Children learn to communicate using non-verbal cues such as body language, facial expressions, and gestures. Educators help children understand and interpret non-verbal communication, promoting empathy, social awareness, and effective interpersonal skills.
  5. Listening and Attention: Children develop active listening skills and the ability to sustain attention during conversations, stories, and group activities. Educators model attentive listening and provide opportunities for children to practice listening and responding to others, fostering effective communication and social interaction.
  6. Expressive Communication: Children learn to express themselves effectively through spoken language, gestures, facial expressions, and artistic expression. Educators encourage children to express their thoughts, feelings, and ideas in a variety of ways, promoting creativity, self-expression, and confidence in communication.
  7. Social Communication: Children develop social communication skills such as turn-taking, sharing, and conversational skills. Educators provide opportunities for children to engage in cooperative play, group discussions, and collaborative activities, fostering positive relationships and effective communication within peer groups and social settings.

Teachers can work on these areas within their classrooms by implementing one or more of the following into their programming and curriculum cycles.

Storytelling Circle:
Gather children in a circle and take turns telling stories. Encourage children to use their imaginations and creativity to come up with their own stories, or provide prompts and story starters to get them started. This activity promotes oral language development, storytelling skills, and confidence in communication.

Book Sharing:
Set up a cosy reading corner with a variety of age-appropriate books and encourage children to explore and enjoy them independently or with peers. Provide opportunities for children to engage in shared reading experiences with educators or older children, promoting early literacy skills and a love of reading.

Puppet Shows:
Create a puppet theatre or puppet corner where children can put on puppet shows for their peers or educators. Encourage children to use puppets to express themselves, tell stories, and engage in role-play scenarios, promoting creativity, communication, and social skills.

Language-rich Environment:
Create a language-rich environment with print-rich displays, labels, and signage that encourage children to engage with written language. Provide opportunities for children to interact with written materials through literacy-related activities such as writing letters, making lists, or creating signs for their play spaces.

Show and Tell: Invite children to bring in items from home to share with their peers during a show and tell session. Encourage children to describe their items, share stories or experiences related to them, and answer questions from their peers, promoting communication skills, confidence, and social interaction.

Collaborative Art Projects:
Provide opportunities for children to work together on collaborative art projects such as murals, group paintings, or collage-making activities. Encourage children to communicate and negotiate with their peers, share ideas, and work together to create something meaningful and unique.

Dramatic Play:
Set up a dramatic play area with props and costumes related to different role-play scenarios (e.g., restaurant, doctor’s office, post office). Encourage children to engage in imaginative play and use language to communicate and negotiate roles, props, and scenarios with their peers.

Music and Movement:
Incorporate music and movement activities into daily routines, such as singing songs, playing musical instruments, or participating in dance and movement games. Encourage children to express themselves through music and movement, fostering creativity, self-expression, and social interaction.

These activities provide opportunities for children to develop their communication skills, including verbal and nonverbal communication, active listening, social interaction, and literacy skills. By engaging in meaningful and interactive experiences, children develop the confidence and competence they need to communicate effectively and engage with others in a variety of contexts.

By focusing on Learning Outcome 5 – Children are effective communicators, educators empower children to become confident and effective communicators who can express themselves, engage with others, and participate fully in social and academic contexts. Through supportive interactions, meaningful experiences, and intentional teaching strategies, children develop the language, literacy, and numeracy skills they need to succeed in school and beyond.


The wrap up:

The Australian Early Years Learning Framework (EYLF) provides a comprehensive and holistic framework for promoting children’s learning and development in early childhood education settings. Through its five learning outcomes, the EYLF emphasises the importance of nurturing children’s sense of identity, connection with their world, wellbeing, confidence as learners, and effectiveness as communicators.

By focusing on these outcomes, educators are empowered to create rich and meaningful learning experiences that support children’s growth across all domains – physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and linguistic. The EYLF encourages educators to take a child-cantered approach, valuing each child as a unique individual with their own strengths, interests, and abilities.

Furthermore, the EYLF recognises the critical role of families and communities in children’s learning and development, fostering partnerships that support and enrich children’s experiences both within and beyond early childhood education settings.

As we continue to embrace the principles and practices outlined in the EYLF, we not only lay the foundation for children’s success in school and beyond but also contribute to building a more inclusive, equitable, and sustainable society. Through our collective efforts, we can empower children to become lifelong learners, confident and compassionate individuals, and active contributors to their communities and the world.